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    Short-Course Volume 41
    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry in the Earth Sciences:
    Gleaning the Big Picture from a Small Spot

    Complementary figures in color version

    All figures available in color versions PDF Format (20,2 MB)

    Single color figures

    FIG. 1-3. Photographs of various types of ion microprobes utilized in the analysis of geological samples

    FIG. 2-8. Schematic of the IMS1280, large radius, high resolution, multicollecting ion microprobe/ SIMS

    FIG. 2-9. Annually banded speleothem from Soreq Cave, Israel dated by U-series geochronology to span 22.0-1.3 ka (Bar-Matthews et al. 2003)

    FIG. 2-12. Zircon grains cast in epoxy showing smooth flat tops and ~30 micrometres of relief due to polishing

    FIG. 2-16. Isopachs of Ordovician St. Peter sandstone in SW Wisconsin

    FIG. 2-24. Fluorescent image of a 1 mm section of speleothem from Soreq Cave, Israel produced by laser confocal microscopy for several annual light-dark couplets dated ca. 1.65 ka

    FIG. 2-25.
  • (A) Values 18O(calcite) measured by ion microprobe for wet (light fluorescent band) and dry (dark band) season growth across a speleothem from Soreq Cave, Israel
  • (B) Values of 18O dark-light(= 18O dark cc-18Olight cc) for single annual bands show a decrease in maximum values of 18O from 2.0-1.3 ka.
  • (C) Estimates of annual precipitation (mm/y)calculated from the measured 18O of wet season calcite
  • (D) Changes in lake level of the Dead Sea

    FIG. 2-31. Oxygen isotope profile measured at WiscSIMS in the zoned zircon from Fig. 2-28

    FIG. 3-1. Schematic cross section of a collision cascade showing the implantation of the primary beam ions into the matrix, the generation of the secondary beam of ions, and mixing between layers (in the third dimension) in complex stratified samples

    FIG. 3-4. Image of a variety of sample holders used for SIMS analysis

    FIG. 3-6.
  • (a) Map of the southwestern United States and Mexico showing the δD contours for meteoric water, location of turquoise sources (mines), and archaeological sites where turquoise artifacts have been recovered (modified from Harbottle & Weigand 1992)
  • (b) Detailed map of a portion of the southwestern United States showing the sources of the turquoise artifacts recovered from Chaco Canyon and the site in the Guadalupe
  • Community
    FIG. 3-9. Relationship between δ18 values and δ13 values, for calcite, early dolomite, and Fe-dolomite

    FIG. 3-10. Photomicrographs of pyrite textures, Mascot-Jefferson City District Zn district, East Tennessee

    FIG. 3-11. Sphalerite rosette (sample sds1 from Young Mine) with compositional and isotopic data


    Short Course Presentation:

    Chapter 1. INTRODUCTION to SIMS IN GEOLOGY BY Richard Stern

    Chapter 2. IN SITU OXYGEN ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY BY ION MICROPROBE John W. Valley & Noriko T. Kita

    Chapter 3. HYDROGEN, CARBON, NITROGEN AND SULFUR ISOTOPE MICROANALYSES BY SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY by Mostafa Fayek

    Chapter 4. LITHIUM, BORON AND CHLORINE ISOTOPE DETERMINATION BY SIMS by Graham D. Layne

    Chapter 5. QUATERNARY GEOCHRONOLOGY BY SIMS by Axel K. Schmitt

    Chapter 6. IMPROVING DEPTH PROFILE MEASUREMENTS OF NATURAL MATERIALS: LESSONS LEARNED FROM ELECTRONIC MATERIALS DEPTH PROFILING by Jerry Hunter

    Extra Talk. SIMS U-Th-PbGEOCHRONOLOGY by Richard Stern


    © 2006 Mineralogical Association of CanadaLast update 2014-02-05